EXCLUSIVE: U.S. Veteran Witnesses ‘Massive’ UFO over Lake Michigan in ‘Manitowoc Incident’ Short Film

By Jon Kelly

NewsInsideOut.com

Vancouver, BC – An exclusive short film published to social media on April 10, 2019, offers viewers an inside look at what one U.S. Marine Corps veteran described as a “massive” UFO incident that took place near a Lake Michigan nuclear power station the night of March 24, 2019. A bizarre cluster of scintillating lights said unlike anything in the current known U.S. military arsenal was observed and recorded in flight over several hours by long time Manitowoc, WI, resident Myles Panosh and his videographer friend Jeff Lavicka. Running under 15 minutes the “Manitowoc Incident”’s stunning enhanced HD UFO footage, 8-bit granular audio analysis, dramatic recreation and voices of witnesses transport viewers deep into the heart of what may be the biggest UFO story of 2019.

UPDATE: The status of this report has been downgraded in an important update published April 15, 2019. Click here to read the update.

U.S. Marine Corps veteran Myles Panosh says he was on a telephone call that evening discussing UFO experiences with Sheboygan, WI, resident Shelly Schmidt when he looked out from his window and spotted a “huge” UFO over the vicinity of Point Beach Nuclear Plant in neighboring Two Creeks. Unable to capture the subject with his iPhone he enlisted help from neighbor Jeff Lavicka at 8:45 p.m. local time. The videographer then successfully imaged the mysterious event using a Samsung Galaxy S4 and was able to observe the incident until approximately 11:30 p.m..

What the videos show include multi-colored lights appearing at the apexes of a seemingly opaque wedge-shaped “Star Destroyer”-like spacecraft attended periodically by additional luminous bodies in flight blinking on and off in the nearby field of view. There are no stars or other celestial bodies visible in the background suggesting the UFO’s luminous emissions were brighter than starlight and that the subject was operating within Earth’s atmosphere. It stands to reason that if the smartphone camera’s low-light threshold included imaging of celestial objects, dozens would have appeared in each upwards-facing video frame accompanying the subject under clear night sky conditions described by the witness.

Such a simple analysis concludes that the video images do not depict stars and planets but rather subjects of magnitudes greater than starlight whose emissions fall within the visible range of the camera sensor (where other celestial objects do not register). It is clear from these images the Samsung Galaxy S4 is incapable of resolving distant binary star systems at night but is clearly suited to the task of collecting UFO evidence under dark sky conditions where subjects flying within Earth’s atmosphere emit significant illumination of their own.

The role of primal hypnotic scintillating lights in UFO incidents (like the bioluminescence of cuttlefish stalking their prey) may in some cases be interpreted as a pacifier of observers transmitting “nothing to see here” signals to individuals who may otherwise mobilize some sort of active response. The effect has been observed by this reporter during field research in the British Columbia wilderness where helicopter-like light activity on nearby ridgetops seemed ironically normal under conditions where such vehicles were very unlikely to appear.

During their telephone interviews for the “Manitowoc Incident” both Myles Panosh and Shelly Schmidt recounted a subculture of testimonies from local residents and visitors to the area who said they had seen lights in the sky near the nuclear site and over Lake Michigan. An article from the Detroit Free Press from March of this year cited eerie lights appearing along near 200 miles of Lake Michigan shoreline in witness reports from 1994 highlighting how these reports remain unsolved to the present day.

John Carpenter’s “Starman” (1984) crashed an extraterrestrial scout ship on the northwestern side of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in Chequamegon Bay, WI. The city of Green Bay and the Door Peninsula where the Point Beach Nuclear Plant is stationed reside off the southeast edge of the same forest. According to lifelong resident Myles Panosh fishing tourism was wildly popular on the peninsula shoreline during the 1960s and 1970s attracting visitors including high-profile celebrities such as Johnny Carson.

Tales of UFO sightings at the nuclear site are said to have been part of the fishing subculture and the area’s reputation as a UFO hotspot may well have earned it an indirect placement in the film’s cosmology. Viewed from this perspective the “Starman”’s miraculous silver spheres might have gleaned some of their mystique from uranium dioxide pellets used in reactor fuel rods where nuclear power is touted as a fount of miracles by today’s Fukushima-deaf industry shills.

According to the Union of Concerned Scientists fire protection problems and groundwater leaks plague Point Beach. Multidimensional environmental stakeholder ET interests in U.S. nuclear power plants remains a sensitive taboo subject where employees held economic hostage fear for job safety and onsite security protocols preclude bringing public attention to ETs and these incidents through the present day.

It remains otherwise incomprehensible how local residents using smartphone camera technology were able to release stunning images of such an apparently massive display whereas all of the local and regional airport radar sensors plus security system sensors at the nuclear site remain effectively silent in communicating facts of these events in the public domain (as if they registered nothing at all). Clearly the culture of an ongoing cover-up persists in modern America outliving the Pentagon’s 2017 Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) moment in the New York Times.

According to trained military observer Myles Panosh what he saw and Jeff Lavicka recorded that night was “Not anything we have. No way. Not even close. Not a chance. It was not a star. It was not a planet. It was not a meteor. It was definitely (by definition) an Unidentified Flying Object.” Viewers can watch the short film “Manitowoc Incident” on social media for free and learn how public contact with and video recording and reporting of dramatic UFO experiences can be big, bold and beautiful.

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9 Replies to “EXCLUSIVE: U.S. Veteran Witnesses ‘Massive’ UFO over Lake Michigan in ‘Manitowoc Incident’ Short Film”

  1. Very interesting, however I would have liked to have heard from someone with some Professional Knowledge instead of gases as far as distance and angles or degrees. Maybe someone from the military Air Base who could talk about options or possibilities

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